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Voices

"The Active Circle is a family, I feel like I'm part of something. I feel really supported in the work that I do."

Evan Chamakese, Pelican Lake First Nation

Here is a list of ideas for keeping little people physically active when it is just too cold to spend a lot of time outdoors.

Hopping
Tape a hopscotch grid with low tack masking tape onto the floor. Use a rolled up sock as your marker and have fun hopping some energy out. Or try taking SHAPEscotch indoors as found here on Playopedia.
Jumping
Spread your lounge cushions around on the floor and have fun jumping from island to island. Add a listening element to the game by calling an instructions such as,
“On the island” – Jump onto a cushion
“In the sea” – Jump onto the floor, between the cushions
“Lying on the sand” – Lay down on the cushion
“Fish in the sea” – Lay down on the floor
“Palm tree” – Stand on one leg, on the island, with arms spread wide
Throwing
Small bean bags are fabulous for all sorts of indoor active play and much safer for throwing indoors than balls. Pop a target down on the floor (basket, shoe box, hoop) and have a competition to see who can throw the most bean bags into the target. You can find a tutorial for making bean bags here.
Batting
Give each player a cardboard food wrap roll and see how long you can keep a balloon up in the air, without it touching the ground.
Balancing
How many body parts can you balance a small beanbag (or hardcover book) on? What about your head, elbow, knee, hip, shoulder, hip, back and foot?
Stacking
Grab a packet or two of plastic drinking cups and have a competition to see who can stack the tallest tower. Set a challenge, can you make a tower as tall as you are?
Riding
Bring the outdoors in – if you have the space for a bike track through your home, bring your child’s scooter, trike, or space hopper indoors. This is especially good for young children learning to ride, scoot or bounce.
Hiding
Make a cubby house with your dining chairs and a bed sheet or play hide and seek.
Mix it all up
Create an indoor obstacle course. Try;
Using chairs for tunnels to crawl under,
Couch cushions to climb over,
A masking tape line to tiptoe along,
A hula hoop to jump into or through, and
Plastic cups as cones to run around.
Or make an animal dice, like this one at House of Baby Piranha, to encourage moving like animals in all sorts of ways – flapping, sliding, jumping, running, waddling, to name just a few!

Hopping

Tape a hopscotch grid with low tack masking tape onto the floor. Use a rolled up sock as your marker and have fun hopping some energy out. Or try taking SHAPEscotch indoors as found here on Playopedia.

Jumping

Spread your lounge cushions around on the floor and have fun jumping from island to island. Add a listening element to the game by calling an instructions such as:\

“On the island” – Jump onto a cushion

“In the sea” – Jump onto the floor, between the cushions

“Lying on the sand” – Lay down on the cushion

“Fish in the sea” – Lay down on the floor

“Palm tree” – Stand on one leg, on the island, with arms spread wide

Throwing

Small bean bags are fabulous for all sorts of indoor active play and much safer for throwing indoors than balls. Pop a target down on the floor (basket, shoe box, hoop) and have a competition to see who can throw the most bean bags into the target. You can find a tutorial for making bean bags here.

Batting

Give each player a cardboard food wrap roll and see how long you can keep a balloon up in the air, without it touching the ground.

Balancing

How many body parts can you balance a small beanbag (or hardcover book) on? What about your head, elbow, knee, hip, shoulder, hip, back and foot?

Stacking

Grab a packet or two of plastic drinking cups and have a competition to see who can stack the tallest tower. Set a challenge, can you make a tower as tall as you are?

Riding

Bring the outdoors in – if you have the space for a bike track through your home, bring your child’s scooter, trike, or space hopper indoors. This is especially good for young children learning to ride, scoot or bounce.

Hiding

Make a cubby house with your dining chairs and a bed sheet or play hide and seek.

Mix it all up

Create an indoor obstacle course. Try;

Using chairs for tunnels to crawl under

Couch cushions to climb over

A masking tape line to tiptoe along

A hula hoop to jump into or through

Plastic cups as cones to run around.

Or make an animal dice to encourage moving like animals in all sorts of ways – flapping, sliding, jumping, running, waddling, to name just a few!

Read more here

Active Circle Communities

Seine River First Nation and Fort Frances Friendship Centre, Ontario

With the support of GEN7 messenger Kent Brown, the community is planning activities for youth and young girls.


Katarokwi Native Friendship Center, Kingston, Ontario

The community is working with Gen7 Messenger Josh Sacobie around regular visits and events with the youth and the center.


Pelican Lake First Nation, Saskatchewan 

The community's youth council has been planning and implementing a number of activities including a girls only program, outdoor sports and leadership training.


Aboriginal Sports and Recreation Circle of Newfoundland and Labrador

The ASRCNL is working with CAAWS and Motivate Canada on the You Go Girls program in 7 communities.

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